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UR20Z

Dumpster Diver
i dont know anything about horses but is that a real breed?
Only in the world of Photoshop.

A "paint horse" (or sometimes "Pinto", depending on who you're speaking to and how anal-retentive they are about proper terminology - these are usually folks who have paid the big bucks to have their horse registered as a "Paint", and they tend to be shirty about how a Pinto is "just a horse", but a "Paint" is somehow special) is a fairly generic color-pattern description - It doesn't speak to the actual colors involved, but to the "splat" effect. Aside from a special exception for registration purposes, a Paint or Pinto is always a multi-color horse - Generally two colors (though there may be shading of the color) with *VERY* rare tri-color variants that usually, but not always, turn out to be genetically chimeras - two separate sets of genes in different parts of the body - VERY strange shit involved there - ALL *TRUE* "Brindle" horses tested to date have turned out to be Chimeras, one was genetically both male and female, and genetically black AND red (usually two colors that are mutually exclusive in a single horse) depending on where on the body the sample was taken from - the best theory is that they're "failed twins" - only one gets born, but that one actually absorbs a fraternal twin early in the pregnancy - but I'm getting off on a tangent) The colors in a "Paint" or "Pinto" are White (more correctly, gray - there's no such thing as a "white" horse. Look up "Lethal white syndrome" - they might be born, but they rarely survive more than 2-3 days, and I've never heard of one making it to breeding age), and "any other color a horse might be". Within the range of "Paint" or "Pinto", there are three "subdivisions" - Tobiano, Overo, and Sabiano - which describe whether the white or the "color" is dominant, and within those three subdivisions are a couple more, that describe where the splashes of color/white most often appear on the body. A "Frame Overo" paint, for instance, usually has a white head/face, or at least large amounts of white on the head and face, and blue eyes, and is often mostly white with "splats" of color that might be anywhere on the body - usually along the spine and down the flanks, but that can vary. A Tobiano usually has more color than white, and the head is almost always solid color. "Splats" of white might be just about anywhere else on the body, especially the legs and back. And so on.

Appaloosas are a special case that some (those who don't know the difference, mainly) consider to be paints, but are actually a separate breed that's genetically distinct from paints, in fact - and ARE NOT paint horses, despite having spots and splashes.

The special exception I mentioned is the solid (or very nearly solid) colored horse born out of a paint mare or sired by a paint stallion - those are called "Breeding Stock Paints", and if they are later bred, they MAY produce registrable paint babies - the genetics are there, but might not be visibly expressed as a paint pattern.

And thus ends tonight's mini-lecture on what a paint horse is - it could go on a good while longer, but I ain't got the ambition to do a full-coverage article when you can easily google/bing/duckduckgo it and find more that I've just plain forgotten about. :)
 
Only in the world of Photoshop.

A "paint horse" (or sometimes "Pinto", depending on who you're speaking to and how anal-retentive they are about proper terminology - these are usually folks who have paid the big bucks to have their horse registered as a "Paint", and they tend to be shirty about how a Pinto is "just a horse", but a "Paint" is somehow special) is a fairly generic color-pattern description - It doesn't speak to the actual colors involved, but to the "splat" effect. Aside from a special exception for registration purposes, a Paint or Pinto is always a multi-color horse - Generally two colors (though there may be shading of the color) with *VERY* rare tri-color variants that usually, but not always, turn out to be genetically chimeras - two separate sets of genes in different parts of the body - VERY strange shit involved there - ALL *TRUE* "Brindle" horses tested to date have turned out to be Chimeras, one was genetically both male and female, and genetically black AND red (usually two colors that are mutually exclusive in a single horse) depending on where on the body the sample was taken from - the best theory is that they're "failed twins" - only one gets born, but that one actually absorbs a fraternal twin early in the pregnancy - but I'm getting off on a tangent) The colors in a "Paint" or "Pinto" are White (more correctly, gray - there's no such thing as a "white" horse. Look up "Lethal white syndrome" - they might be born, but they rarely survive more than 2-3 days, and I've never heard of one making it to breeding age), and "any other color a horse might be". Within the range of "Paint" or "Pinto", there are three "subdivisions" - Tobiano, Overo, and Sabiano - which describe whether the white or the "color" is dominant, and within those three subdivisions are a couple more, that describe where the splashes of color/white most often appear on the body. A "Frame Overo" paint, for instance, usually has a white head/face, or at least large amounts of white on the head and face, and blue eyes, and is often mostly white with "splats" of color that might be anywhere on the body - usually along the spine and down the flanks, but that can vary. A Tobiano usually has more color than white, and the head is almost always solid color. "Splats" of white might be just about anywhere else on the body, especially the legs and back. And so on.

Appaloosas are a special case that some (those who don't know the difference, mainly) consider to be paints, but are actually a separate breed that's genetically distinct from paints, in fact - and ARE NOT paint horses, despite having spots and splashes.

The special exception I mentioned is the solid (or very nearly solid) colored horse born out of a paint mare or sired by a paint stallion - those are called "Breeding Stock Paints", and if they are later bred, they MAY produce registrable paint babies - the genetics are there, but might not be visibly expressed as a paint pattern.

And thus ends tonight's mini-lecture on what a paint horse is - it could go on a good while longer, but I ain't got the ambition to do a full-coverage article when you can easily google/bing/duckduckgo it and find more that I've just plain forgotten about. :)
thank you for explaining it in a very informative way and thank you for not being one of those people who thought i was dumb and kinda laughed/made fun of me
 

Loup Perdu

Zooville Settler
image0.png
 

UR20Z

Dumpster Diver
The most terrifying part? There are people alive (well, by SOME definitions of "alive"- mostly ones that include walking around while possessing the intellectual capacity of a rock) who would actually argue that this is an image of reality!
 

Loup Perdu

Zooville Settler
The most terrifying part? There are people alive (well, by SOME definitions of "alive"- mostly ones that include walking around while possessing the intellectual capacity of a rock) who would actually argue that this is an image of reality!
Yeah pretty scary indeed.
 

Oldman

Moderator
Staff member
The most terrifying part? There are people alive (well, by SOME definitions of "alive"- mostly ones that include walking around while possessing the intellectual capacity of a rock) who would actually argue that this is an image of reality!
There was a point in time, where 2 frat boys, bet each other they could get other people to believe, that they believed the earth was flat. To win the bet, they had to convince the poor soul that the earth was flat.
Why? Because at one point, i refused to believe that someone could possibly be that stupid, to believe in this nonsense (barring the actual intellectually challenged of course).

Today, I see proof, first hand, that there are people that stupid (for a lack of a better word we have yet to invent). I don't know if it is because of where I work, or the possibility that there are that many people, that have somehow avoided a death worthy of an entry in Darwin's journal.

Congratulations humanity. We are now 5 steps closer to Idiocracy.
 
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