Veterinarian here: ask me anything!

Good points and thoughts for consideration! Thanks for chiming in. I love forums for exactly this long form type of discussion!
❤️
First of all is the alarming takeover of veterinary medicine by large investment firms.
Combined with the tremendous amount of school loans post vet school, and the high starting salaries at these places. It's a difficult situation to navigate for new graduates.
Second is the resistance of U.S. veterinary medicine to take heed of the ever growing number of scientific studies that suggest disturbing the balance of the endocrine system is a very bad idea wrought with lots of negative consequences
Europe has always been ahead of us in scientific advancement and veterinary medicine. It's hard to change something that is culturally ingrained and has been traditionally black and white into a grey area. Put yourself in the shoes of a US vet for a bit -- incredibly overworked and exhausted, when will you have the time to even read the science and data about all but a smattering of the many different medical issues you deal with from day to day -- unless you have a personal interest in the sterilization debate and a client base who are supportive of that. Ultimately, we are a service industry, and I can't do things that the owner doesn't agree to. I can provide advice and counseling, but at the end of the day, the decision to spay or neuter isn't ours.
But the thing that concerns me the most is that its not at all hard to draw lines connecting to flow of money to certain things, such as "drug marketing detailing" of the vets and the colleges alike.
Human medical schools don't allow pharmaceutical companies to put on events and provide free food and information about using their products to students, though they once did! Veterinary schools still do. The hope is that students continue to exercise rational decision making and thinking when making veterinary recommendations in the future -- sometimes though, there is only a single medication or product on the US market for treating a certain condition, and there aren't other options even if we wished for European medications that do the job better.
Follow the money. It didn't start out like this, but now that this is the "norm" the folks with the control dont want it to change. They like the fact that your dog will have more ailments and live a shorter life because it makes them more money.
I disagree. From a purely cynical financial perspective, a dog living longer not shorter, will make more money as they rack up stuff for the management of all of the diseases that come with a less robust immune system and time.
Distressingly I am beginning to conclude that dogs are now seen as furry dollar signs to the investor controlled market.
Veterinary medicine is very much a business model and for profit, even historically when it was all small businesses owned by individual vets. Like it or not, dogs have to be afforded before you have enough demand to begin developing medications for conditions and treatments. Every veterinarian has to decide ethically where they fall on the scale of needing to make a salary to afford to feed and house themselves, and taking care of animals. That's why it's important to be empowered that YOU are responsible for managing your dog's health and well being, and your vet is part of the team devoted to that with a lot of other folks, rather than an authority delivering statements from on high like the 70s. I think this dynamic change has led to better accountability for vets as well as lifting the curtain on our profession for the general public and allowing them to participate in their dog's care.
Not all vets are falling into this mess. But sadly, it is getting worse at an alarming rate. MARS now owns about one quarter of all vets globally in the markets I've studied.
Vets can still be devoted to what's best for your animal and you while also working for somewhere big. It's a lot more nuanced and difficult to navigate than simply following the ownership. But when the choice is to take a corporate buy out or fire your entire staff of 20 years, many of whom are like family and have children who have gone to school together because you can't find an associate veterinarian to take over a practice because they are all working in the big attractice hospitals in larger cities -- what's the best move then? Do you go down with the ship and put everyone out of a job? The problem is huge and has a lot of nuances, but I feel your frustration.
Thank DOG for the likes of Germany, Sweden, Finland, Norway and the others who demonstrate and educate on the right way to live with dogs.
I had a situation recently where I had need for Alizin treatment, something I could easily get in most other countries, but was very difficult to get here in the states. But one I found a clinic with clearance from the American FDA to have it, it saved the life of my dog without surgery.
Or the case of human insulin, that so many people depend on for life saving treatment -- patented by its creator at $1 because he strongly believed that nobody should not be able to afford to treat such a pervasive condition as diabetes. Price of a vial in the US currently? Over $200. We can't even straighten out human medications in our nightmare of a health care system -- not to even mention veterinary stuff.
FYI the 16th letter of the alfabet doesn't work on this old junker< amongst other keys as well>. I had to get creative in my grammar.
And ya did an excellent job with it XD
 
Howdy zooville!

I work as a mixed animal veterinarian, and am willing to answer any and all animal health questions you may have to the best of my ability. Keep in mind that I’m only one person, and my medical opinion is just that—an opinion, however well informed it may be.

Anything you’re curious about?

Edit: feel free to Dm me if needed!
Little patches/pumps, very small and widely dispersed, of dry skin that eventually flake away. Tried different shampoos. Feed home made, natural foods rather then pallets. Groom 2 to 3 times a week.
Any suggestions?
 
That's exactly right, but neither of these pose an oral risk from kissing a dog.

You're looking at different routes of infection for both of those parasites. Hookworms are released as eggs into the soil from dog feces, hatch, and then burrow into your skin via the soles of your feet or other exposed areas -- in the US, hookworm burden in children was dramatically decreased from a public health standpoint once folks could afford to buy shoes for everyone! Human infection usually involves the confused baby worm wandering around inside your skin (we aren't their natural hosts) making little tracks that itch.

Roundworms are released from the dog in feces and are invective via ingestion, meaning children, putting stuff they shouldn't in their mouths once again are the highest demographic -- high risk situations are areas with poor sanitation where poop is lying around presenting a perfect opportunity for the parasites. Once ingested in humans, they also migrate around searching for their natural host, but for a reason we don't precisely understand, they make it to the eye a lot more often, causing permanent blindness usually in one eye.

Two excellent reasons why we recommend always picking up dog poop and keeping your dog on a good parasite monitoring plan and prevention as needed!
I was making the assumption that an infected dog licking their butt (without the owner knowing) then kissing shortly after would transmit roundworms via the fecal material. Or licking the ground picking up larva of hookworms and then kissing the owner. It's not common to hear about zoonotic hookworm infections from zoos so I tell people it's rare but it seems possible.
 
I was making the assumption that an infected dog licking their butt (without the owner knowing) then kissing shortly after would transmit roundworms via the fecal material. Or licking the ground picking up larva of hookworms and then kissing the owner. It's not common to hear about zoonotic hookworm infections from zoos so I tell people it's rare but it seems possible.
Good points, but hookworms are deposited in the soil and must hatch into a larvae who then develop from one form to another over a series of weeks before becoming infective. Round worm eggs also sit and develop with the worm still inside the egg for 4-5 weeks before being transmitted as infectious. Neither of these guys can complete that development inside a human being directly post ingestion.

I would still firmly place hookworm infections in adult zoos at the cause of the environment.
 
Little patches/pumps, very small and widely dispersed, of dry skin that eventually flake away. Tried different shampoos. Feed home made, natural foods rather then pallets. Groom 2 to 3 times a week.
Any suggestions?
Seasonal? Itchy? Skin problems are difficult to solve in person, much less via forum. :D What does your vet say about it? How have you gone about formulating the homemade diet, and are you sure it’s nutritionally complete?
 
Sadly, you are exactly right. There is no known treatment that I am aware of, nor is there even a vaccine for it. Based on the way goats are treated and managed for CAE, I don't think there's any motivation for pharmaceutical companies to even try and develop one. I'm so sorry to hear about your girl -- it's a hard thing to manage and watch, and keeping her comfortable with things like regular hoof trims and supportive care is the best you can do for her.
Yes, two ladies came together. One I had to kill when she was just one year. Joint problems, big pain and later organ failure.
I suspected this one could be affected, but after a decade I was rightfully hoping she was either resistant or asimptomatic.

Using some horse hoof oil as It *might* still be just very dry hoof cracks. But the "clack" sound is not good omen

Q: She seems to take well on some store (animal based)collagen + hilauronic acid supplement. Would that be if any help for the arthritis?

-- just some memories, backstory here --
My vet had no cattle knowledge but loves her job (that is why I have her as vet :) ) and is open to "experiment". At first I pointed without much hope it *could* be joint problem by vitamin / mineral deficit so we tried a suplement.
I mean... CAE test are not 100% reliable individual wise. So I went Gregory House way. Two options. One is dead patient, lets treat for the second. Did not work.

Later, when organs collapsed told me to call and ask the zone cattle vet, who told me he had never seen such case of anemia through bleeding in the urine clots and all.
 
Good points, but hookworms are deposited in the soil and must hatch into a larvae who then develop from one form to another over a series of weeks before becoming infective. Round worm eggs also sit and develop with the worm still inside the egg for 4-5 weeks before being transmitted as infectious. Neither of these guys can complete that development inside a human being directly post ingestion.

I would still firmly place hookworm infections in adult zoos at the cause of the environment.
I'm confused. The article said that humans can get infected by hookworms from soil and roundworms from feces. If the infected soil or feces takes a short ride in a dog's mouth before getting on/in the human, does that change if the infection happens?
 
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I'm confused. The article said that humans can get infected by hookworms from soil and roundworms from feces. If the infected soil or feces takes a short ride in a dog's mouth before getting on/in the human, does that prevent the infection?
Unless I got it wrong, it seems easy.

No direct infection from the dog.
BUT if they sit for x weeks on a suitable ground, then that ground is infected with viable parasites and the moment you put that on your moith, you can get infected.

At that point, sure, I do not think it will make a difference if you put the dirt on your mouth directly, or the dog picks it with his mouth and transports it to yours 🙂

But in the latest, the culprit is not the dog, but the lack of higiene for not cleaning in weeks. Also, preventive deworming your dog will go a long way to avoid it
 
Seasonal? Itchy? Skin problems are difficult to solve in person, much less via forum. :D What does your vet say about it? How have you gone about formulating the homemade diet, and are you sure it’s nutritionally complete?
Diet has been reviewed by Vet. Have not mentioned the pumps yet to Vet..... appt on Friday though
 
I'm confused. The article said that humans can get infected by hookworms from soil and roundworms from feces. If the infected soil or feces takes a short ride in a dog's mouth before getting on/in the human, does that change if the infection happens?
Right on, @Goattobeloved. The soil is infective, yes, but not immediately so. (And the hookworms in the soil ultimately came from feces!) It takes time for the egg to develop to a stage to infect before it’s possible. In feces it’s the same way.
 
I believe kissing is relatively safe but there are sometimes severe risks that I prefer everyone be aware of. We all love animals so much it and probably don't like thinking about negatives. I've experienced some infections that healed on their own, sore throat and probably quicker receding gums.
 
Two questions, 1. Are you male , Female, 2nd, active?
Based on my time here, I feel like this is a loaded question, so let me establish a couple things before I answer. If you didn't mean this question in this way you've nothing to worry about, and you can feel free to ask follow ups -- perusing your post history you may not. I don't think being zoo changes the way that one interacts sexually online or otherwise -- it doesn't suddenly make me any different than I normally would be as a hetero-normative person.

No I will not share photos, nor will I consider sharing my location without knowing folks for a good while first. I also don't share my dogs -- I don't swing that way. I'm male, and an active and very happy zoo, yes.
 
I meant no disrespect or harm I was/am curious I have no other interest where you live etc. I actually think it is a plus to have the knowledge here.
 
I meant no disrespect or harm I was/am curious I have no other interest where you live etc. I actually think it is a plus to have the knowledge here.
Wonderful! That’s why I prefaced it with those things. Glad it was in good faith—I agree! Even though we should be careful about what we share on here, a small bit of knowledge goes a long way towards beginning to foster connections and potential friendships. ❤️
 
How to become a vet tech without going to a university? Do they have trade schools?
They sure do! You may not reach as high a level as you could if you had a degree, however. It also depends entirely on the practice you work for, and the country you work in as to if you work as a vet tech or a vet assistant (salaries and duties between the two differ). Right now the US market is in desperate demand for veterinary technicians, and this has driven salaries up, but they still aren't to the level that I think they should be for employing folks with such a broad range of knowledge and skill.
 
Howdy zooville!

I work as a mixed animal veterinarian, and am willing to answer any and all animal health questions you may have to the best of my ability. Keep in mind that I’m only one person, and my medical opinion is just that—an opinion, however well informed it may be.

Anything you’re curious about?

Edit: feel free to Dm me if needed!
I have only met one veterinarian (male) that was into zoo a little (only watching type), but it's an online friend not irl...
I have been thinking the last few days that i should study to be a Veterinarian myself -maybe next year i'll apply-

Any fellow zoo veterinarian you personally know? Lol it must be a whole topic of bioethics.
 
Any fellow zoo veterinarian you personally know? Lol it must be a whole topic of bioethics.
There’s a couple of us! But I think not super common, at least identifiable.

I don’t see it as a whole topic of bioethics profession wise, though it’s very important to get the ethics of being zoo straight for your own sanity and lifestyle as well as for the benefit of our community. But at work, I am not interacting with my patients any differently because I’m zoo any more than your human doctor would with patients. Self control, decency, respect, and professionalism are of course still major values regardless. Now I may be the best in my clinic at collecting dogs for semen preservation, but that’s just a measure of personal interest, skill, and pride in my craft ❤️
 
How to become a vet tech without going to a university? Do they have trade schools?
Hello,

It would be best to research your specific country, state, province, whatever. There are more and more places implementing controls on who can be a vet tech. You might still be able to be a vet assistant in those places but I wouldn't recommend that as a career choice unless you know of a practice that you can work at for life.

Generally you don't need a full degree to be a vet tech but again it is best to figure out the specifics based on where you live or plan to live. There are specialties within vet tech as well and they have their own requirements so again it is best to do some planning. You can always do more school later and if you end up working at an academic institution there will likely be programs to advance your education cheaply.

I would caution that being a vet tech is hard for animal lovers. You will see animals in all sorts of terrible situations. Owners that cannot or don't want to do things for their animals. Bad owners. Sick animals that can't be helped. You'll learn lots about insurance companies and products designed mostly to extract money from desperate people. You will get blamed for all sorts of things when owners have trouble processing grief. You will meet bad veterinarians and ones who are only there for the money. You might even have to work with some, possibly for a long time with no control over the situation. One day you'll find yourself relived that someone can't afford the surgery because it means you won't have to stay late and cancel those plans you had again.

It is a career that eats some people alive and could result in a lot of wasted time if it turns out it isn't for you. I would recommend volunteering or shadowing to get some real world experience before committing to schooling.
 
Hello,

It would be best to research your specific country, state, province, whatever. There are more and more places implementing controls on who can be a vet tech. You might still be able to be a vet assistant in those places but I wouldn't recommend that as a career choice unless you know of a practice that you can work at for life.

Generally you don't need a full degree to be a vet tech but again it is best to figure out the specifics based on where you live or plan to live. There are specialties within vet tech as well and they have their own requirements so again it is best to do some planning. You can always do more school later and if you end up working at an academic institution there will likely be programs to advance your education cheaply.

I would caution that being a vet tech is hard for animal lovers. You will see animals in all sorts of terrible situations. Owners that cannot or don't want to do things for their animals. Bad owners. Sick animals that can't be helped. You'll learn lots about insurance companies and products designed mostly to extract money from desperate people. You will get blamed for all sorts of things when owners have trouble processing grief. You will meet bad veterinarians and ones who are only there for the money. You might even have to work with some, possibly for a long time with no control over the situation. One day you'll find yourself relived that someone can't afford the surgery because it means you won't have to stay late and cancel those plans you had again.

It is a career that eats some people alive and could result in a lot of wasted time if it turns out it isn't for you. I would recommend volunteering or shadowing to get some real world experience before committing to schooling.
I all ways tell people you can learn for free, just volunteer, or bring a work crew a thing of coffee, I learned tons on our infrastructure systems, and I mean deep details, just by bringing service crews coffee on their breaks and talking to them, same idea, chat with people int he field, volunteer when one can and be amazed at the opportunities that arise!
 
I all ways tell people you can learn for free, just volunteer, or bring a work crew a thing of coffee, I learned tons on our infrastructure systems, and I mean deep details, just by bringing service crews coffee on their breaks and talking to them, same idea, chat with people int he field, volunteer when one can and be amazed at the opportunities that arise!
Great point! And there's all sorts of associated professions that work closely with animals, even in the veterinary adjacent context, without being a vet tech or veterinarian, but some of them are not as visible. That's why shadowing is an excellent suggestion from @TwistedStallion.
 
There’s a couple of us! But I think not super common, at least identifiable.

I don’t see it as a whole topic of bioethics profession wise, though it’s very important to get the ethics of being zoo straight for your own sanity and lifestyle as well as for the benefit of our community. But at work, I am not interacting with my patients any differently because I’m zoo any more than your human doctor would with patients. Self control, decency, respect, and professionalism are of course still major values regardless. Now I may be the best in my clinic at collecting dogs for semen preservation, but that’s just a measure of personal interest, skill, and pride in my craft ❤️
Pride in ones craft is a wonderful thing! But decency, respect and professionalism are what define you as a practitioner and as a guide and guardian to your patients and their humans.
 
Which means that the campaign of sterilization isn't the primary culprit for all these stray dogs. If it worked, we wouldn't have them.
I agree 100% And my vets have always been supportive of me in the decisions ive made about my male dogs. They know me and they know that im responsible and im sure they deal with much weirder things that their clients feel strongly about (nutrition, vaccination, extendable leashes (!!))
 
Hey there!
Just curious to know if prostaglandins in human semen have the same effect on a dogs cervix as it does in a human? Inducing contractions and softening of the cervix, etc
And vice versa I guess - dog semen on a human cervix?!?!
 
Pride in ones craft is a wonderful thing! But decency, respect and professionalism are what define you as a practitioner and as a guide and guardian to your patients and their humans.
Indeed. It is also time for veterinary medicine to transition as a whole to the veterinarian being part of the team of people who devote themselves to an animal's care rather than the end all authority delivering unquestioned pronouncements from on high. But that's another soapbox entirely.
 
Hey there!
Just curious to know if prostaglandins in human semen have the same effect on a dogs cervix as it does in a human? Inducing contractions and softening of the cervix, etc
And vice versa I guess - dog semen on a human cervix?!?!
This is an excellent question. Let me do some perusing of the literature -- not as familiar with human semen composition or receptors -- and get back to ya!
 
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