Surefire way to tell how big puppies will get?

Sheppermutt

Citizen of Zooville
I am researching a future female dog. However, not all puppies come from a breeder, some of them were accidental pairings which lead to mixed breeds.

Is there any way to know with decent accuracy how large a puppy will be? For example, let's say the mom was 110 pounds and the dad was only 60. Will the pups grow up to be near the average of 85lbs? Or will it vary near those extrema? Like, a puppy takes after dad more than mom and would be in the range of 50-70lbs? Do the pups gender have any impact on this likeness? Eg: are female pups more likely to be around 110-120lbs (mom's) range while males around dad's range?

I get the feeling that it might just be random chance.

Thank you for any input.
 
A sure way? I do not think so.
They will usually be something in the middle, but even then, there are genetics from previous generations that can impact, so you may even get bigger than mom or smaller than dad.

A more or less... usable way to tell "that will grow large" or this "this will be smaller" is usually the paws.
Paws develop slower than the rest of the body, so they start bigger. Typically a bigger paw in a pup usually means a larger adult.
 
i'm totally pulling this out of my ass, but i think pups take more from dad than from mother. i know of a case where a pyreneese boy got to a gsd girl and all the pups turned out to be what looked like weirdly colored pyreneese pups, even larger than the dad. made me wonder how painful it must have been to push them out for the girl, she was like half the size of the dad.

as @Goattobeloved said about the paws, it is a kinda good way how to gauge adult size. ever seen a great dane puppy? their feet are massive.
 
The others write it well, it's hard to define. My two dogs they became smaller than the mother and father. Fortunately, my smallest dog is still 75 lbs/34Kg.
Look for a puppy whose parents roughly match their breed, and they are big.
 
When can you tell a puppy's final size more easily? It's best to let new born puppies go to their new homes after 8-12 weeks. Are they grown enough then to have a good idea of the final size?
 
It's best to let new born puppies go to their new homes after 8-12 weeks. Are they grown enough then to have a good idea of the final size?
Not really. Got my boy the day he turned 8 weeks. Over the next 2 months he was basically doubling in weight every 2 weeks. I guess by the time he was 4 months old would could tell how big he was gonna be, he was all gangly, but at 8 weeks he was very much still a pup. Though he is a pure breed, so...
 
When can you tell a puppy's final size more easily? It's best to let new born puppies go to their new homes after 8-12 weeks. Are they grown enough then to have a good idea of the final size?
I would say the 8-12 week is *mandatory* so the pups learn to play and control themselves and can socialize later on.

There is, obviously, no problem you going there be with them any time before that... as long as the owner does not get tired of you 😅
(Added benefit if you know them, you might find the right pick for you... or *get picked* by the right one 😅)

Other than that, what @dartel says.
You know they will be growing like weeds for a full year, then some more, but can't be sure of where they will end.

Mine was growing an steady 6-7 kg a month for a time, I thought he'd become a BIG one, then stopped all of a sudden at a barely minimum for the breed. Fine as it comes.
 
Nah, not a chance you can predict that if you don't know the parents.
Paw size is not a guarantee... I had a small breed dog with very big paws, so, I thought he would get bigger, but he stayed under 10 kilos for his whole life 😆
 
Nah, not a chance you can predict that if you don't know the parents.
Paw size is not a guarantee... I had a small breed dog with very big paws, so, I thought he would get bigger, but he stayed under 10 kilos for his whole life 😆
In this scenario the parents are known. It's just the uncertainty from them being different sizes/not the same breed that I am wondering about.
 
Oh... I see.
If they are of different sizes (and different breeds) it doesn't help much to know the parents, because there are too many variables to count, in this case...
You could try to gather some more data if you know the weight of the puppy at around 3 months... Not a sure indicator, but if at that age it weighs more than 10 kilos, there's a high chance it will grow big (and if you can join this info with paw size, it's even more accurate as a guess).
But nothing is certain at 100% with a mixed breed...
 
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