How to chose the right dog, help needed?

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abc2020

Guest
Hi there, a Newbie question.
Myself and hubby are looking to play with a dog long term and I really want to experience a big knot, but before we get a dog/puppy I have few yes and no’s.
So, I want the dog to be short haired, sociable and with a decent cock/big knot and a good stayer/performer. It also needs to be of a decent height so preferably Husky/Doberman height. Can you let me know your favourite breeds? Lots of love xx
 

MRYP

Zooville Settler
Husky or Doberman height?
Doberman height is significantly taller than husky.
I'd suggest you both a Labrador Retriever. You can't do anything wrong with a Lab. They are also extremely sociable and kind dogs.

Don't ever choose a dog by the size of its genitals. And please take proper care of the dog. A dog is more than just sex and requires a lot of attention and work.
 
A

abc2020

Guest
Husky or Doberman height?
Doberman height is significantly taller than husky.
I'd suggest you both a Labrador Retriever. You can't do anything wrong with a Lab. They are also extremely sociable and kind dogs.

Don't ever choose a dog by the size of its genitals. And please take proper care of the dog. A dog is more than just sex and requires a lot of attention and work.
Hi thank you for your reply. Of course we will take care of him, let’s Just say he will have everything he wants. ?
I like the idea of big knot, hence my comment and my preference Is of a short Haired dog like a Doberman or ridgeback. Any experience people in either ?
 

MRYP

Zooville Settler
Hi thank you for your reply. Of course we will take care of him, let’s Just say he will have everything he wants. ?
I like the idea of big knot, hence my comment and my preference Is of a short Haired dog like a Doberman or ridgeback. Any experience people in either ?
A Labrador is shorthaired.
 
A

abc2020

Guest
I've heard plenty of good things about labs. That being said, even medium-sized breeds can have good size dicks. I had a Blue Heeler as a teenager that was more than enough for me lol.
Ok, will add them to the list, thank you ?
 

Autsfun

BANNED
In choosing a breed or mix breed of k9 I understand the desire for his anatomy how ever that shouldn’t be the determining factor. Depending on breed he will be with 12 years give or take. Do you want an active breed, long or short hair, non allergenic, guard/protective, will children be in the picture, will he be kenneled a lot if you both work some dogs are more prone to separation anxiety and can be destructive, some breeds are more prone to vet visits. My Belgium Malinois is 10 going on 11 and the smartest boy I have had but he also sheds so much I could weave his sheddings as much as I love him I can promise my next pup will not be a Belgium Malinois. You have probably considered all of this but I hadn’t seen it mentioned. Good luck in your hunt for a new family member.
 
A

abc2020

Guest
In choosing a breed or mix breed of k9 I understand the desire for his anatomy how ever that shouldn’t be the determining factor. Depending on breed he will be with 12 years give or take. Do you want an active breed, long or short hair, non allergenic, guard/protective, will children be in the picture, will he be kenneled a lot if you both work some dogs are more prone to separation anxiety and can be destructive, some breeds are more prone to vet visits. My Belgium Malinois is 10 going on 11 and the smartest boy I have had but he also sheds so much I could weave his sheddings as much as I love him I can promise my next pup will not be a Belgium Malinois. You have probably considered all of this but I hadn’t seen it mentioned. Good luck in your hunt for a new family member.
we have talked about different breads, hence the Short haired choice and yes we know he will be with us for considerable amount of time. We do want a decent size dog, that’s one of the requirements we agreed on x
 

sxwd

Zooville Settler
One of my best lovers was a doberman-mix. Very high sexual energy and well-endowed - in his prime he could go for hours. He was also a sweet dog but tended to be more of a one-person dog and was protective of his property (me).
 
A

abc2020

Guest
One of my best lovers was a doberman-mix. Very high sexual energy and well-endowed - in his prime he could go for hours. He was also a sweet dog but tended to be more of a one-person dog and was protective of his property (me).
Thank you, what do you have now?
 

sxwd

Zooville Settler
Thank you, what do you have now?
A lab-mix - he is also a great dog. Very playful and loves attention - gets along with everyone. He is about 80 lbs. and maybe 6" with a 3" dia. knot. He is good for 2-3 back to back sessions at age 8.
 
A

abc2020

Guest
A lab-mix - he is also a great dog. Very playful and loves attention - gets along with everyone. He is about 80 lbs. and maybe 6" with a 3" dia. knot. He is good for 2-3 back to back sessions at age 8.
Ok, yes Labrador is one of our dogs as an option. How long is his session? Does he knot every time or not?
 

sxwd

Zooville Settler
Ok, yes Labrador is one of our dogs as an option. How long is his session? Does he knot every time or not?
About 20-30 seconds. I'm very experienced so I can control if we knot - if we do; he lasts about 10 minutes before shrinking.
 

SigmaTheZeta

Esteemed Citizen of ZV
Hi there, a Newbie question.
Myself and hubby are looking to play with a dog long term and I really want to experience a big knot, but before we get a dog/puppy I have few yes and no’s.
So, I want the dog to be short haired, sociable and with a decent cock/big knot and a good stayer/performer. It also needs to be of a decent height so preferably Husky/Doberman height. Can you let me know your favourite breeds? Lots of love xx
I have been on a kick of suggesting to people that they might want to pick a breed that is popular in their area. An obscure breed for your area could have a smaller local breeding population and therefore higher odds of inbreeding and therefore a higher propensity for genetic problems. Any generally popular breed is a good idea for similar reason.

If you want my opinion about the best breed, I am a narrow-minded breed-supremacist bigot, and the impartiality of my opinion is dubious. However, if you got a Labrador retriever or Lab-mix, I could also give you lots of great advice on making one of them happy. Bouncy balls. Just stock up on them, and use them often. Retrievers are fanatical over them.
 
A

abc2020

Guest
I have been on a kick of suggesting to people that they might want to pick a breed that is popular in their area. An obscure breed for your area could have a smaller local breeding population and therefore higher odds of inbreeding and therefore a higher propensity for genetic problems. Any generally popular breed is a good idea for similar reason.

If you want my opinion about the best breed, I am a narrow-minded breed-supremacist bigot, and the impartiality of my opinion is dubious. However, if you got a Labrador retriever or Lab-mix, I could also give you lots of great advice on making one of them happy. Bouncy balls. Just stock up on them, and use them often. Retrievers are fanatical over them.
Thank you so much for the info, of course that would be great, can we take this to the messages? X
 

Autsfun

BANNED
Over the years I have had a German Wirehaired Pointer, my first my fathers dog, a Samoyed, Saluki, Great Pryneese, Bouiver, and now a Malinois. I be loved them all and each had their own personality. The Great Pry was the largest 160 pounds and yes did have the equipment to go with his size. At the time I wasn’t to keen on a dog turning though it would happen. He was a heavy load to carry from there I got the Bouiver he was also well endowed 110 pounds. I must admit both breeds were easy in the home not overly active or distructive. Actually a funny story about my Bouiver my spouse at the time had a coworker stop by the house our Bouvier had never met him so was sniffing him as dogs do and for some unknown reason he decided it would be neat to scare Zcar so he jumped at him. All Zcar did was lean forward bare his teeth and give a low growl. My X’s friend jumped back saying BAD IDEA!! I laughed my ass off I’d never seen Zcar even bark at anyone but it was reassuring to know that he had no back down in him. Actually I considered a Bouvier again Rotti sized if he shed any it came out in patches and in the home he’d lay down and watch. My biggest issue with him was getting him out of the car if we went for a ride, let me take that back he had a bread and was a sloppy drinker. After Zcar I got a Belgium Malinois smartest boy I’ve had teach him something once and he knew it more active than the Bouiver or Great Pry, less endowed but 70 pounds. Easier on the back but he is going to be eleven this summer and I can tell his hips are starting to bother him. I actually just put a deposit down on an upcoming Doberman litter. I know a bit about Dobermans some issues with separation anxiety, a bit high strung, but some pluses as well smart, trainable, obedient, dry mouth, short hair and protective. I guess I am not really answering your question about what breed to get I also have a three year old Pitt mix bitch fixed that has stolen my heart she gets out she will run to everyone but me. She will bark but if an intruder broke in all he’d have to worry about is getting hurt by her wagging tail. If you get a decent pup not one from someone that has no clue to breeding and raise it as a family member I feel any breed of dog will be a loyal companion. Equipment wise it’s a box of chocolates you don’t know till you know. A bit long winded sorry. Aut
 

Wantatie

Lurker
Hi there, a Newbie question.
Myself and hubby are looking to play with a dog long term and I really want to experience a big knot, but before we get a dog/puppy I have few yes and no’s.
So, I want the dog to be short haired, sociable and with a decent cock/big knot and a good stayer/performer. It also needs to be of a decent height so preferably Husky/Doberman height. Can you let me know your favourite breeds? Lots of love xx

My boy is an American Mastiff. At first I was a little apprehensive due to the size alone but after a few sessions and now, a few years of experience, I wouldn't have any other dog.

Some pros and cons from my experience. I am only speaking for myself here.

Pros -

Temperament - My boy is incredibly respectful and doesn't show any signs of our relationship when it's not time. Our signal is me putting a towel down on the ground and that is the only time he gets going. I don't have to worry about him trying to tear me down in front of guests.

Size - Very large but can be a con depending on how you look at it. He is about average for the breed, 170 pounds and his package matches his stature. It might take some getting used to at first, but now I wouldn't have it any other way.

Health - I have had no health issues with him. He is about 5 years old. I know that this can be a dog by dog basis, but as a breed I don't see them having nearly as many problems as other dogs I had growing up.


Cons -

Drool - I literally keep a small kitchen rag in the living room because he drools so much and it is definitely in your best interest to wipe his mouth if he is drooling heavy. Especially when he is in the mood sitting at my feet, he will drool what seems like a cup, it's ridiculous. Also, guess what that means during a tie? I can't tell you how many times I've had a big glob of drool hit the back of my neck or the side of my face while he is over me panting...

Size/Strength - Like I said earlier, this is also a pro but a con as well. During sessions with my boy, he thrusts very hard and is quite large so unless you are a girl that likes or can deal with some cervix bumping pain, this might be a deal breaker. Also, he can be incredibly forceful when it comes to breeding. While I could stop it just by getting up during a mount if I don't feel like it, in the event of a tie, I can't really just decide ''I don't want this anymore'' Or ''It's too painful'' and stop. You gotta ride it out.

Height - For us to ''match up'' nicely, meaning his cock isn't too high or low in doggie style, I have to put a throw pillow under my knees and even then, he can still be too high (ouch).


Let me know if you have any questions or would like to chat, I can give some more input. This is by far my favorite breed now and wouldn't choose any other dog.

 
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sinfull

Tourist
I suggest a Ridgeback for what you are looking for they are great dogs good height and knot size great bread get along with almost everyone and aren't considered dangerous breeds for housing
 

Wolfia

BANNED
I have been on a kick of suggesting to people that they might want to pick a breed that is popular in their area. An obscure breed for your area could have a smaller local breeding population and therefore higher odds of inbreeding and therefore a higher propensity for genetic problems. Any generally popular breed is a good idea for similar reason.

OMG yaass!!! Pick a popular breed because they're easier to take care of instead of those pesky obscure ones that may need extra attention!!! Lol you're ridiculous and I feel so bad for anyone who doesn't know who you are and takes your advice.



I suggest a Ridgeback for what you are looking for they are great dogs good height and knot size great bread get along with almost everyone and aren't considered dangerous breeds for housing

They're also quite athletic which means knotting doesn't substitute daily runs or jogs. Other breeds oh can walk. They are also prone to aggression issues with other dogs and can be territorial.

2 Rhodesian 2 Rotties...1 exhausted Momma
 

SigmaTheZeta

Esteemed Citizen of ZV
OMG yaass!!! Pick a popular breed because they're easier to take care of instead of those pesky obscure ones that may need extra attention!!!
Sometimes, relatively unknown breeds can be popular over a particular geographic area. For example, there is the Carolina dog, which is related to the dingo, the Indian pariah dog, the chihuahua, the Mexican and Peruvian hairless, and probably others that are not coming immediately to mind.

The official breeding group is actually relatively narrow, but their native range is actually in the southeastern United States. If you look around for dogs that are up for adoption, you can find many dogs that are quite obviously, if not Carolina dogs, at least Carolina dog mix. However, if you lived wayyyy over in California, far away from the native range of the Carolina dog, and got a purebred from someone that breeds them, then that dog is really coming from an extraordinarily narrow breeding population.

In one geographic area, you can't avoid them, which is really good news for protective genetic diversity, but in the other, the population is so small that you are going to run into potential genetic bottlenecks that could result in major genetic problems that lead to an uncomfortable and unpleasant existence for the dog.

The Carolina dog is therefore an example of one breed that many people do not really even know about, but they are abundant in certain areas. Many people even outright deny that dogs existed in the United States before the Europeans came: the narrative some people believe is that there was nothing but wolves and coyotes, here, and "white man" came and released their dogs to run amok and destroy native habitats. They are genuinely uncomprehending of the fact that the Americas have always had indigenous landrace breeds. Unfortunately, it has been only recently that more Southerners have been taking more pride in their native wildlife, so in spite of these "yellow dogs" being a famous symbol of the region, it is only recently that we have been acknowledging that these dogs are an indigenous part of our fauna that is unique to our region. Old Yeller acted like a wild animal because Old Yeller actually WAS a wild animal. They have been a part of our way of life for so long, we just never thought about how they got there. They run loose because they are wild animals, and they are therefore SUPPOSED to run loose.

However, the right place for the dog is in an area where that particular breed has already been proved to be both successful and popular.

There might be reasons why that dog is popular there. In the case of the Carolina dog, they are specially adapted for the unique climate and geography of the southeastern United States in ways that other breeds or even coyotes and wolves are not. It's a wet climate, down here, with lots of thick vines and briars that would lead to torn, matted, and unruly coats in many breeds. They are popular precisely because they are uniquely adapted for the area, and they have been successful as a landrace breed.

Essentially, I was not saying that it is bad to want an unusual breed, and in fact, there could be many highly unusual, unique breeds that have uncommonly high breeding populations in your specific area, possibly for very good reasons that are unique to the strengths and adaptations of that particular breed.
 
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A

abc2020

Guest
Sometimes, relatively unknown breeds can be popular over a particular geographic area. For example, there is the Carolina dog, which is related to the dingo, the Indian pariah dog, the chihuahua, the Mexican and Peruvian hairless, and probably others that are not coming immediately to mind.

The official breeding group is actually relatively narrow, but their native range is actually in the southeastern United States. If you look around for dogs that are up for adoption, you can find many dogs that are quite obviously, if not Carolina dogs, at least Carolina dog mix. However, if you lived wayyyy over in California, far away from the native range of the Carolina dog, and got a purebred from someone that breeds them, then that dog is really coming from an extraordinarily narrow breeding population.

In one geographic area, you can't avoid them, which is really good news for protective genetic diversity, but in the other, the population is so small that you are going to run into potential genetic bottlenecks that could result in major genetic problems that lead to an uncomfortable and unpleasant existence for the dog.

The Carolina dog is therefore an example of one breed that many people do not really even know about, but they are abundant in certain areas. Many people even outright deny that dogs existed in the United States before the Europeans came: the narrative some people believe is that there was nothing but wolves and coyotes, here, and "white man" came and released their dogs to run amok and destroy native habitats. They are genuinely uncomprehending of the fact that the Americas have always had indigenous landrace breeds. Unfortunately, it has been only recently that more Southerners have been taking more pride in their native wildlife, so in spite of these "yellow dogs" being a famous symbol of the region, it is only recently that we have been acknowledging that these dogs are an indigenous part of our fauna that is unique to our region. Old Yeller acted like a wild animal because Old Yeller actually WAS a wild animal. They have been a part of our way of life for so long, we just never thought about how they got there. They run loose because they are wild animals, and they are therefore SUPPOSED to run loose.

However, the right place for the dog is in an area where that particular breed has already been proved to be both successful and popular.

There might be reasons why that dog is popular there. In the case of the Carolina dog, they are specially adapted for the unique climate and geography of the southeastern United States in ways that other breeds or even coyotes and wolves are not. It's a wet climate, down here, with lots of thick vines and briars that would lead to torn, matted, and unruly coats in many breeds. They are popular precisely because they are uniquely adapted for the area, and they have been successful as a landrace breed.

Essentially, I was not saying that it is bad to want an unusual breed, and in fact, there could be many highly unusual, unique breeds that have uncommonly high breeding populations in your specific area, possibly for very good reasons that are unique to the strengths and adaptations of that particular breed.
I don’t think I’m going to get the Carolina dog in EUrope ?
 

SigmaTheZeta

Esteemed Citizen of ZV
I don’t think I’m going to get the Carolina dog in EUrope ?
They are a royal pain in the ass. If you ever read the book Old Yeller, even if the dog was not assumed by the author to be a Carolina dog, the animal's behavior is commensurate with many of the breed's idiosyncrasies. They are highly intelligent, not always in the service of their masters, but they are also reputed to be absolutely loyal toward their human packs, although this can make them problematic for anyone that gets many houseguests. They are almost, although not quite, a total loss for anyone that lives in an apartment, and they should never even be considered by someone that did not grow up around them. I would only advise one if you lived in a remote area miles away from publicly maintained roads.
 
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If you want your stud to comfortably stand over his bitch (you) while mating - all you need to is just measure your Anthropometrics. So, you could measure your Buttock to Knee Length (BKL) and then research a breed's Fold Of Flank Height (FOFH) which is also the height of his penis from the ground.
For example, if you measure your BKL as 600mm or 36 inches, then your stud's FOFH needs to be 600mm or 36 inches, thus you may suit a short haired XL breed;
- The Broholmer (699 to 749mm is the height of their Withers)
- The Anatolian Shepherd (737mm is the height of their Withers)
- The Saint Bernard (711 to 762mm is the height of their Withers)
- The English Mastiff (762mm is the height of their Withers)
- The Spanish Mastiff (711 to 889mm is the height of their Withers)
- The Neapolitan Mastiff (662 to 787mm is the height of their Withers)
- The Great Dane (762 to 813m is the height of their Withers)
 
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